Saturday, 30 August 2008

knife + fork = ?

if spoon + fork = spork then knife + fork = ?
31 August 2008 at 07:11 , Geeb said...

Knork - it's obvious! But then I didn't know how to get bubbles into acryllic!

31 August 2008 at 07:12 , Geeb said...

Nor, I have just noticed, can I spell acrylic!

31 August 2008 at 09:40 , Mark said...

Now I would initially have gone with knork but everything I could find suggested that knorks don't have a serrated edge rather they cut via some weird rocking motion that I don't quite understand from the pictures.

I guess knork still seems the best answer I was just wondering if there was a different word given the serated edge which makes it quite tricky to use as a fork without cutting the corner of your mouth!

31 August 2008 at 09:57 , Geeb said...

I'd never heard of a knork. I thought it was just an amusing question. Having Googled the utensil and seen metal knorks I would suggest that the serration is a way of overcoming the difficulty of making a successful sharp cutting edge on a plastic utensil. In other words I would suggest the issue of a serrated edge over a non-serrated edge is not a relevant issue.

31 August 2008 at 09:59 , Mark said...

that seems more than sensible, so knork it is

31 August 2008 at 10:38 , Spesh 1 said...

Personally, I would have said that knife + fork = hopefully, a very good meal?!

31 August 2008 at 16:51 , Scriptor Senex said...

Why knork? why not Fofe?

31 August 2008 at 17:56 , Geeb said...

As in feef, fife, fofe, fumb. Hmmm. Prefer Knork. I did fleetingly consider ferk but that just sounded like fork in Glaswegian and knirk but that sounded like an undesireable irritating person. So Knork it was for me. Thought Spesh's comment was the best though!

31 August 2008 at 18:52 , Mark said...

of course even if we agree on a name it still leaves open the question of which section of the cutlery draw it should go in!

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